Quijote

QUIJOTE

Puppetry, Shadow Play and Object Theatre

Ages 8 and up

 

The clown duo formed by Benjamin Déziel and Maude Gareau set the tone for a production full of mischief, humor and fun finds. (…) With Quijote, Ombres Folles is asking questions of interest about the importance that is given today, in this era of social networks, to the image that we project, to the point that we disguise the truth to make it more exciting … like Don Quijote!
Daphné Bathalon, Montheatre.qc.ca, November 18th, 2018

 

Free adaptation of the Miguel de Cervantes novel The Ingenious Nobleman Don Quijote of La Mancha

In a world – made of paper – that is both ruthless and fragile, Quijote and Sancho are looking for adventure. Stepping in are the vivid and larger-than-life imagination of the frail knight as well as shadow theatre! But the beliefs of Quijote are too powerful. Wherever he turns everyone thinks he is crazy and people make fun of him. Follow the clown duo into a land where friendship and the search for glory challenge what seems most real: is it just silliness or senseless dreams?

  • Quichotte
    crédit: Jean-Michael Seminaro
  • Quichotte
    crédit: Jean-Michael Seminaro
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    crédit: Jean-Michael Seminaro
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    Crédit: Jean-Michael Seminaro
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    crédit: Jean-Michael Seminaro
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    crédit: Jean-Michael Seminaro
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    Crédit: Jean-Michael Seminaro

CREDITS

Writers, directors and set designers : Benjamin Déziel and Maude Gareau

Performers : Zach Fraser and Mika Laulainen

Music composer and assistant : Olivier Monette-Milmore

Translator in English : Maurice Roy

Puppet designer : Colin St-Cyr Duhamel

Shadow pop-up designer : Isabel Uria

Lighting designer : Gabriel Duquette

Set design collaborators : Anne-Marie Bérubé, Michel Hansé and Leilah Dufour Forget

Advisor-consultants : Maxime Després and Hélène Ducharme

ARTISTIC INTENT

With Quijote, the company is taking on an epic novel that is somewhat of a myth. We were looking for a story that would offer as much potential for action than for philosophical considerations and the unbelievable story of the sorry-faced knight proved to be the answer.

The novel with its powerful dramatic energy is freely adapted and uses puppets, objects and paper as well as shadow theatre. All such elements make up a very interesting medium to work on the Don Quijote’s illusions and echo the questions that Cervantes was asking back in 1605.

Are we not confronted with the murky relationship between what is virtual and what is real? Are we not tempted to disregard reality and so avoid cynicism sometimes? Are we not looking for glory through our virtual identities?

Led by a clown duo of actor/puppeteers, the production recounts the unbelievable adventures of Don Quijote and his friendly squire Sancho Panza. Imagination, humor, friendship and the search for glory await in a world of extravagant shadows.